College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

2017 Dean’s Doctoral Fellows

Jonatan Barreiro Bastos - Mathematics​

Jonatan Barreiro Bastos is a new graduate student in the Department of Mathematics. He did his undergraduate studies at the University Autonoma of Madrid, Spain. He will work in the area of Harmonic Analysis. This area of mathematics focuses on the analysis of functions and transformations that act on them. Some of the applications of the mathematical theory behind these concepts in other disciplines include the study of signals and how they get filtered and decomposed into basic components which can reveal patterns and structures.

 

Matt Erickson – Sociology

Matt earned his bachelor’s degree at KU in journalism and political science, and after working for a while as a journalist and communicator he has returned to study sociology. He is interested in family, gender, and work issues. In particular, he hopes to conduct research about people who move somewhere (or stay put) for the benefit of their partner’s career. He is curious about a number of questions: How has the gender gap among these “tied movers” and “tied stayers” changed over time? How do families that move for the benefit of a woman’s career differ from those that move for the benefit of a man’s career? How do couples – including same-sex couples – decide whose career to favor when choosing where to live?​

 

Joe Panushka - Molecular Biosciences

Panushka’s general research interests include bacterial pathogenesis, structural biology, and protein biochemistry.  He is especially interested in discovering new ways to combat antibiotic resistance. He aims to use several different biochemical, genetic, and computational approaches to study the proteins and other cellular components involved in both antibiotic resistance and bacterial pathogenesis. ​

 

Suma Suswaram - Speech-Language-Hearing

Suswaram has completed research with hundreds of children with Autism and their families in her native India.  She is currently interested in understanding the effects of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) on Social communication skills in Children with Autism and investigating cross-cultural differences in assessing and treating children with autism.​

 

Elizabeth Tampke – Clinical Child Psychology

Tampke is interested in researching childhood aggression and its relationship with negative outcomes. More specifically, this includes how reactive and proactive aggression contribute to bullying and victimization, poor interpersonal relationships, and other immediate and longitudinal externalizing behaviors. In addition to examining aggression and negative outcomes, she is also interested in researching the etiology of aggressive behavior. Her ultimate goal as a researcher is to advance the scientific literature on childhood aggression and subsequently improve clinical interventions for aggressive youth.

 

2017 Chancellor’s Doctoral Fellowship Awardees

  • Anna Klompen – Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
  • Hannah Scupham – English
  • James Paul Estes – French & Italian
  • Luis Lomeli – Spanish
  • Brianne Richson – Psychology
  • Courtney McDaniel - Communication Studies (alternate)